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The National Jewish Student Survey

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the National Jewish Student Survey?

The National Jewish Student Survey is a major research initiative designed to examine the identities of Jewish students in Britain today. Its core purpose is to inform the future policy and programming of UJS Hillel, which, together with Pears Foundation, commissioned the study, and to influence the way in which a range of Jewish community organizations work with and invest in Jewish students in the future.

Who conducted the research?

The research was undertaken by the Institute for Jewish Policy Research (JPR). JPR is an independent research organization, consultancy and think-tank that specializes in contemporary Jewish affairs, and works closely with a range of Jewish charities and organizations. JPR has stood at the forefront of British Jewish research for the past two decades, and is responsible for most of the data that exist on the British Jewish community.

JPR was assisted in this project by Ipsos MORI, one of the largest and best known research companies in the UK and a key part of the Ipsos Group, a leading global research company. Ipsos MORI’s primary role was to manage the online survey, and to advise on the construction of the online questionnaire. All data analysis was conducted by JPR, and JPR alone was responsible for authoring the final report.

The project is a collaborative venture with funding and support coming from Pears Foundation, as well as UJIA, the Rothschild Foundation (Hanadiv) Europe and the Maurice Wohl Charitable Foundation.

When and where did it take place?

Fieldwork for the online survey was conducted in February and March 2011, and focus groups took place in the early summer. All the work took place in the UK.

What issues are explored in the report?

The National Jewish Student Survey is a study of Jewish identity. It investigates the relationship between Jewish students’ upbringing and their attitudes, beliefs, activities and aspirations. In particular, it explores their community affiliations (synagogue, school, youth movements), their social lives, their perspectives on what being Jewish means, and their overall experience of being Jewish on campus today.

To download a copy of the 2011 National Jewish Student Survey click here