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Different Antisemitisms: perceptions and experiences of antisemitism among Jews in Sweden and across Europe
Author(s): Lars Dencik and Karl Marosi
Date: 08 March 2017

Based on data commissioned by the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights and gathered and analysed by JPR, and the Anti-Defamation League survey of attitudes towards Jews, this is the third report exploring the perceptions and experiences of antisemitism among Jews in EU Member States.


European Jewish Digest: Latest edition
Author(s): Richard Goldstein
Date: 01 August 2016

JPR’s monthly European Jewish digest provides a concise look at some of the major events impacting on Jewish life around Europe, as well as a few other stories you may have missed.


Could it happen here? What existing data tell us about contemporary antisemitism in the UK
Author(s): Jonathan Boyd and Daniel Staetsky
Date: 13 May 2015

As temperatures rise about antisemitism in the UK, JPR takes an independent look at some of the existing data, drawing on multiple sources to ascertain the nature of the problem, its scale, its direction of travel, and what more research work needs to be done to develop effective policy.


From Old and New Directions: Perceptions and experiences of antisemitism among Jews in Italy
Author(s): Sergio DellaPergola and L. D. Staetsky
Date: 03 February 2015

Based on data commissioned by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) and gathered and analysed by JPR's academic team, this is the second in a series of reports looking at the perceptions and experiences of antisemitism among Jews in different EU Member States.


The Exceptional Case? Perceptions and experiences of antisemitism among Jews in the United Kingdom
Author(s): L. D. Staetsky and Jonathan Boyd
Date: 18 July 2014

The first in a new series of country reports on antisemitism across Europe demonstrates that Jews feel more secure in the UK than elsewhere, but that Orthodox Jews are most at risk of harassment and discrimination.


EU survey of Jewish people’s experiences and perceptions of hate crime, discrimination and antisemitism
Author(s): European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA)
Date: 08 November 2013

Published by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), this report is based on the data gathered and analysed by JPR and Ipsos MORI after we were commissioned by the EU to conduct the survey. It constitutes probably the largest survey of European Jews ever undertaken.


Jewish life in Europe: Impending catastrophe or imminent renaissance?
Author(s): Jonathan Boyd
Date: 08 November 2013

Providing a summary of existing research, and drawing extensively on the new data gathered by JPR for the European Union, we investigate the various hypotheses that exist about how life is changing for Jews today in different parts of Europe.


Hate crimes against London's Jews
Author(s): Paul Iganski, Vicky Kielinger, Susan Paterson
Date: 04 July 2005

The complete findings of a joint JPR-Metropolitan Police study exploring antisemitic incidents recorded by the police in London, which was carried out in order to get a more accurate feel for their nature and to develop a more effective response to them.


Jews of the 'new South Africa'
Author(s): Barry Kosmin, Jacqueline Goldberg, Milton Shain and Shirley Bruk
Date: 03 February 1999

South African Jews, with their high level of general education and exposure to Western culture, combined with a relatively high level of religious observance and education, are an interesting community in which to test out how Jewish beliefs and values are operationalized in the social world.


Ethiopian immigrants in Israel: experience and prospects
Author(s): Steven Kaplan and Hagar Salamon
Date: 20 January 1998

Seldom has any community undergone as dramatic, complete and irreversible a change in so short a period as the Jews of Ethiopia. As a result, many features of Ethiopian Jewish life remain little understood, especially with regard to their immigration and adaptation to Israeli society.