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Our programme

Data about the community for the community

JPR’s work is driven by a central principle: everything we do should support Jewish community planning and development. We cannot promise that the data, analysis and ideas we generate will provide simple answers to complex questions, but they will provide an important empirical basis for policy debate, and a vital component in any discussion about the future of Jewish life in the UK, Europe, and across the Jewish world. If you would like to talk to us about how our work could help you or your organisation, please email us at jpr@jpr.org.uk.

The future of Jews in Europe

1.4 million Jews live in Europe, 1.1 million of whom are based in the 28 countries of the European Union. Building a robust understanding of the demographic characteristics of these populations and the internal dynamics of community life is essential to the future of Jewish life on the continent. Through our European Jewish Demography Unit, JPR monitors key demographic developments, whilst also undertaking regular research work for major European bodies such as the European Commission and the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights. JPR also houses and manages the European Jewish Research Archive – a free-to-access, online repository of all research work undertaken about Jewish life in Europe since 1990. Our recent research programme has covered multiple countries, including Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.

Jewish life in the UK

JPR plays a key role in the UK Jewish community, providing essential social statistics to organisations operating across the Jewish community. At the core of our work is our Community Statistics Programme, supported by the Board of Deputies of British Jews, that involves measuring fundamental socio-demographic variables such as births and deaths, marriage and divorce, synagogue membership and Jewish school enrolment, all of which play an essential role in shaping our understanding of the community’s present and future. At the same time, we continually monitor and analyse new sources of data on Jews in the UK, most notably the UK Census in addition to the growing number of datasets we gather and hold. Our work in the UK feeds directly into the planning processes of numerous Jewish charities, and our Community Outreach Programme involves regular presentations of our analysis to community bodies operating around the country.

Contemporary antisemitism

Antisemitism is almost certainly the issue that most exercises Jews across Europe today. JPR’s role is to understand it empirically, from an objective scientific perspective, but always with a clear eye on the question of how to combat it. We have worked closely with the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights to examine perceptions and experiences of antisemitism among Jews in multiple EU Member States, conducting two major pan-European surveys that continue to play an essential role in informing policy at both the national and European levels. We also run our Antisemitism in Society Initiative that monitors the attitudes of non-Jews towards Jews and Israel to keep fully abreast of any shifts over time. The JPR team is regularly consulted by international bodies concerned about antisemitism, and we present our analysis at events across the world.

Research commissions

JPR is regularly commissioned to conduct research for charities, foundations and governmental institutions in the UK and across Europe. By holding multiple datasets about Jews gathered over many years, we are well-placed to both delve into these to help charities answer their policy questions, and to determine what issues require the gathering of new data. As a registered charity, we have no interest in making a profit from this work; our aim is always to provide our clients with the most cost-efficient solutions possible, and we are able to offer reduced rates to Jewish charities thanks to the generosity of our donors. As part of this service, JPR is now in the process of developing its work in the area of monitoring and evaluation, with a view towards building a greater capacity to measure the impact of Jewish community development interventions over time. Reports produced for commissioned studies are often only for the internal use of commissioning bodies, so only appear on the JPR website with permission.