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Our publications


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Health and disability in Britain’s Jewish population
Author(s): David Graham
Date: 23 February 2015

The fifth report in our series based on the 2011 UK Census provides accurate counts for the numbers of Jews of different ages who suffer from a health condition or disability. The report finds that approximately 2,000 Jewish children and teenagers have some kind of limiting health condition.


Secular or religious? The outlook of London's Jews
Author(s): David Graham
Date: 22 July 2003

This study is based on a single question in JPR’s 2002 survey of the Jewish community of London and the South East,  in which nearly 3,000 respondents were asked to choose between four options: Religious, Somewhat Religious, Somewhat Secular and Secular.


The political leanings of Britain's Jews
Author(s): David Graham
Date: 29 April 2010

A detailed analysis of the political leanings’ of British Jews which draws on the data from JPR’s 2010 Israel survey. It looks at the impact of age, geography, sex, employment status and religious outlook on support for political parties.


2011 Census: Thinning and Thickening
Author(s): David Graham
Date: 19 December 2013

Investigating geographical shifts in the UK Jewish population, this report in our 2011 UK Census series shows how Jews in Britain are becoming increasingly concentrated in a small number of areas, and publishes data from the censuses in Scotland and Northern Ireland for the first time.


Ethnic and religious questions in the 2001 UK Census
Author(s): Barry Kosmin
Date: 23 July 1999

This paper examines the national census as an important means of fostering a multicultural society and a participatory democracy. Redesigning it for this purpose can have long-term social, political and economic benefits for British society. 


A new Jewish identity for post-1989 Europe
Author(s): Diana Pinto
Date: 09 February 1996

The end of the Cold War opened up new possibilities and new challenges for the Jews of Europe. This report describes some of the new possibilities available for the first time post-1989 for a possible Jewish renaissance.


The economic downturn & the future of Jewish communities
Author(s): Jonathan D. Sarna
Date: 18 August 2009

In JPR's 2009 Morris and Manja Leigh lecture, Professor Jonathan Sarna considers how economic downturns have affected Jewish life in the past  He argues that irrespective of the economic climate, community vitality has always been driven by visionary leaders with the fortitude to shape the future.


Multicultural education in Jewish schools in the UK
Author(s): Geoffrey Short
Date: 02 February 2002

This investigation into the teaching of multiculturalism in Jewish schools studies the approach of senior management and governors in regard to multicultural education, how this is treated in school prospectuses, and its impact upon, and the views of, children attending Jewish day schools.


A portrait of Jews in London and the South-East
Author(s): Harriet Becher, Stanley Waterman, Barry Kosmin and Katarina Thomson
Date: 23 July 2002

A landmark survey of the Jewish population in London and surrounding area based on 2,965 responses from across a broad social spectrum.  Providing information on a wide range of issues of concern to the Jewish community, it has been used as a key source by planners in the Jewish voluntary sector.


Synagogue membership in the United Kingdom in 2010
Author(s): David Graham and Daniel Vulkan
Date: 13 May 2010

Conducted in partnership with the Board of Deputies of British Jews, this study paints a broad portrait of declining levels of synagogue affiliation, but demonstrates how that pattern of decline is being counteracted by some denominational sectors, most notably the strictly Orthodox.