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Our publications


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Young Jewish Europeans: perceptions and experiences of antisemitism - Summary of findings
Author(s): Jonathan Boyd
Date: 05 July 2019

A summary of the findings of our study of young Jewish Europeans, a project commissioned by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA), and published in partnership with FRA and the European Commission.


Moving beyond COVID-19: What needs to be done to help preserve and enhance Jewish communal life?
Author(s): Jonathan Boyd
Date: 09 March 2021

This paper draws together much of the research work related to the coronavirus pandemic that JPR has undertaken and utilised, and makes recommendations about how senior Jewish community leaders and investors should help to preserve and strengthen Jewish communal life going forward.


The Common Good in Europe: Summarizing the issues
Author(s): Jonathan Boyd
Date: 10 February 2009

Based on the written reports of the round table discussions and meetings that comprised JPR's "Res Publica" project, this paper summarises the wide range of issues discussed, and highlight some of the major insights gained during the programme.


Searching for community: A portrait of undergraduate Jewish students in five UK cities
Author(s): Jonathan Boyd
Date: 07 December 2016

A qualitative study, based on research conducted with undergraduate Jewish students in the UK, looking at how they understand their Jewish identity, their experiences of being a Jew on campus, and the types of activities that most engage them.


The Exceptional Case? Perceptions and experiences of antisemitism among Jews in the United Kingdom
Author(s): L. D. Staetsky and Jonathan Boyd
Date: 18 July 2014

The first in a new series of country reports on antisemitism across Europe demonstrates that Jews feel more secure in the UK than elsewhere, but that Orthodox Jews are most at risk of harassment and discrimination.


Immigration from the United Kingdom to Israel
Author(s): L. D. Staetsky, Marina Sheps & Jonathan Boyd
Date: 25 September 2013

Written in partnership with Israel's Central Bureau of Statistics and drawing on their data and the UK Census, this study takes an in-depth look at the numbers and characteristics of Jews who have immigrated to Israel since 1948.


Key trends in the British Jewish community
Author(s): Sarah Abramson, David Graham and Jonathan Boyd
Date: 28 April 2011

Commissioned by the Wohl Charitable Foundation, this report provides a brief synopsis of existing reliable data on three issues within the British Jewish community: poverty, the elderly and children.


Jews of the 'new South Africa'
Author(s): Barry Kosmin, Jacqueline Goldberg, Milton Shain and Shirley Bruk
Date: 03 February 1999

South African Jews, with their high level of general education and exposure to Western culture, combined with a relatively high level of religious observance and education, are an interesting community in which to test out how Jewish beliefs and values are operationalized in the social world.


Jewish families and Jewish households
Author(s): David Graham with Maria Luisa Caputo
Date: 19 March 2015

An innovative study looking at UK census data through the lens of the Jewish family shows that only a quarter of all Jewish homes are comprised of the stereotypical married couple with children, and two-thirds of Jewish households in Britain have no children living in them at all.


A community of communities (full report)
Author(s): Commission on representation of the interests of the British Jewish community
Date: 31 March 2000

This report was the result of more than eighteen months of research and deliberations during which the Commission canvassed as many people as possible within the Jewish community, together with those in the wider society who are the main target audiences of Jewish representation.